• Sophie Smith

Multi-talented BIMM Bristol Alumni, Katriine releases brand new single Like You Do.


Katriine

Meet the person behind Like You Do. Originally from Denmark, relocated Katriine has finished her degree at BIMM Bristol, celebrating by releasing her newest single, Like You Do. I speak to the pop icon about what it means to be queer in music and why we should support female producers.


“Representation matters so much, sometimes you have to see someone who looks like you in order to think you can do that same thing.”

You’ve just finished studying music production at BIMM Bristol, how was the jump from Denmark to Bristol?


It was a big jump for sure! I hadn’t really planned to move to Bristol and pursue music in the way I did. I wasn’t really sure what I wanted to study at university, but I have always had love and passion for music and music production. I had been producing for a while and saw an ad for BIMM on facebook and thought it looked right up my street. I applied thinking I wouldn’t get in, and when I did everything moved really fast and I didn’t really think much about the move, I just did it. I’m a big family person, so the hardest part was leaving my family but I’m grateful I was brave enough to have followed my passion.


“Often when I write lyrics for songs, I just write the first thing that comes to mind and it is not until after the song is written that I understand the meaning myself.”

Like You Do is a catchy banger, I’m a fan! What has your response been like so far?

Thank you! The response has been great, people have been really kind and given me some nice feedback and shared the song which means a lot.

What was the inspiration behind Like You Do?

Often when I write lyrics for songs, I just write the first thing that comes to mind and it is not until after the song is written that I understand the meaning myself. The song is a story about someone never expecting to fall in love, because of never seeing themselves in a straight relationship which they thought was the only relationship they could be in and the euphoria of realising that it is okay to be in a LGBT+ relationship and getting to know your authentic self.

"I’m feeling much more confident being open and sharing my story, because I know how much other LGBT+ artists' honesty and bravery has helped me, and I want to be able to help others in the way other LGBT+ artists have helped me."

How would you describe your music to someone who hasn’t heard you before?

My current music is very upbeat, irresistible pop and dance music vibes. Real feel good dance music!

“Music has always been really important to me. It’s a way for me to explore, experiment and create something new that could end up being something really cool that could mean something to others as well.”

What artists are you listening to at the moment?

Currently I am listening to FINNEAS, the singles for his upcoming album. I think he’s a phenomenal songwriter and producer and I’ve been really enjoying his storytelling and production style!


What are you most proud of in your music career?

I’m the most proud of how much more comfortable I am starting to feel in order to share my music authentically. I used to be scared of being honest, almost afraid to be judged by others within what I share and my sound. I’m feeling much more confident being open and sharing my story, because I know how much other LGBT+ artists' honesty and bravery has helped me, and I want to be able to help others in the way other LGBT+ artists have helped me.

“I’m currently in the process of a project where I am collaborating with other black women and non-binary people which is really exciting.”

Why is music important to you?

Music has always been really important to me. It’s a way for me to explore, experiment and create something new that could end up being something really cool that could mean something to others as well. Music brings me closer to people, it has always been a way to connect for me. I grew up playing instruments with other people. I come from a really musical family, which has been such a blessing growing up.


Women only make up around 3% of music producers in the UK, and the statistics don’t stop here. A separate survey also found that out of 871 people surveyed, only 4 were female producers who were women of colour. What do you think needs to change to encourage women into these roles and to make them safer?


The numbers are so sad when you see them like that. I think things like Saffron Records are a great place that highlight women and black women in music production and tech. They create a safe community that builds up talent and confidence and I think that is so important. I think community is so important, because it makes you feel like you aren’t the only one and you can help build each other up. Representation matters so much, sometimes you have to see someone who looks like you in order to think you can do that same thing. So if you know a woman who produces, send them my way, and I would love to connect with them!



What are your future musical plans?

I’ve got many singles lined up, and I’m actually about to master my next single so I’ve got a lot of music to be released. And speaking of Saffron Records previously - I received their Springboard grant this year. I’m currently in the process of a project where I am collaborating with other black women and non-binary people which is really exciting. So, I have got a few musical projects lined up! This is just the beginning for me!


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